Award-winning tech startup Geltor raises $18.2 million in Series A funding

Geltor, founded in 2015 by CEO Alexander Lorestani and CTO Nick Ouzounov, announced a Series A raise of US$18.2 million. The round, spearheaded by widely-regarded VC firm Cultivian Sandbox for its investments in ag-tech and food tech, brings Geltor’s total funding to date to $23 million. The company’s Seed funding round of $4.75 million was raised in 2015 after the startup participated in the IndieBio accelerator under its former name, Gelzen.

Geltor co-founder and CTO Nick Ouzounov discussing award-winning N-Collage

Investors in Geltor’s Series A include GELITA, the leading global supplier of collagen proteins, and ADM Ventures, the venture investing arm of global food and feed ingredient provider, Archer Daniels Midland Company – alongside investment from Cavallo Ventures and Box Group. “With a team of experienced and passionate PhD scientists behind it, and a unique, science-first approach, the company is pioneering a new industry standard for protein creation and we’re excited to be their partner on this journey,” said Dan Phillips, Managing Director, Cultivian Sandbox Ventures.

Geltor’s proteins are animal-and GMO-free, and are cultivated using a sustainable fermentation process

Geltor is a bio-design startup that creates high-value designer proteins starting with collagen. Its proteins are animal-and GMO-free, and are cultivated using a sustainable fermentation process. Geltor’s Designer Collagen products provide unprecedented functionality and benefits for consumers, while producing less waste and consuming fewer natural resources than the current process sourced from animal waste. Based in San Leandro, California, the company’s flagship consumer product N-Collage is a bio-designed, clinically-tested collagen. Certified Halal, N-Collage is the first-ever vegan collagen technology engineered for unparalleled skincare performance, and was recently distinguished with the prestigious 2018 CEW Beauty “Innovation of the Year” award.

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